Considerations For Data Center Relocation

Data center relocation isn’t as simple as unplugging servers, hauling them to a new site, and plugging them back in. It’s a challenging and complex process that, in many cases, puts the entire company on the line. Sensitive business data and expensive machines are at risk during the move and mission-critical systems will be out of play until the transition concludes. A data center relocation is not something to be left to chance.

 

There are three key factors that come in to play in every data center relocation:

 

  1. Recognize the need for professional help and seek it out.
  2. Take time to plan and document everything.
  3. Get your team in place.

 

Recognize The Need For Professional Help And Seek It Out

 

As we mentioned above, a date center relocation (DCR) isn’t something you can take lightly, nor is it something most businesses can handle themselves. Removing, relocating, and setting up such machinery in a safe and efficient manner is something that is best left to the pros. A DCR project manager needs to be experienced in relocations; one who gets all the planning and pre-move work, like risk identification, budgeting, and workflow planning, that needs to be done in addition to the actual physical move. Those are rare qualities to find in an internal candidate, which is why most businesses hire outside data center relocation professionals to help them with their move.

Take Time To Plan And Document Everything

 

Planning is a crucial step in any DCR, as is documentation. You may be wondering what there is a document and the answer is: Everything! Anytime details are left to one person or in someone’s head, there’s just one point of reference and one point of failure. Your business is worth too much to risk having everything rely on one person. Four documents that are a must for every project are:

  • The present method of operation. This is shows what you have now and what will be moved. It includes diagrams and lists describing everything in the existing environment in great detail.
  • The desired future outcome. This is where you hope to be once the DCR is complete. It defines success and details the placement of all relocated components. It should also include any planned changes such as new equipment and capabilities or upgrades.
  • How you’ll get there. This is your roadmap to success. It defines the processes needed to complete the transition and includes budget numbers necessary to make it happen. It also includes known risks and mitigation options, the DCR timelines, and communication plan.
  • The implementation plan. This is a detailed assignment list and timeline that includes the steps, dates, and personnel needed to complete the DCR. Be sure to include a “Day of Move Plan” to outline what needs to occur and when on Move Day.